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Healthy aging and water drinking: Fascinating findings from a new study

Healthy aging and water drinking: Fascinating findings from a new study

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Almost half of the world’s people do not get the recommended daily total water intake, a new report shows

More drinking enough water can help slow down the aging process for many people.

A recent National Institutes of Health (NIH) study published in eBioMedicine suggests so—though there are caveats to be aware of.

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“The results show that proper hydration can slow aging and prolong disease-free life,” said Dr. Natalia Dmitrieva, study author and researcher at the Laboratory of Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. in Bethesda, Marylandin a news release.

Researchers looked at the relationship between blood sodium levels and certain health markers — and explained that blood sodium levels rise when fluid intake decreases.

Staying well hydrated is linked to better health, fewer chronic diseases and a longer life, a new study shows. Fox News Digital spoke with several doctors who shared some key warnings.
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Adults who had serum sodium levels at the upper end of the normal range were more likely to die at a younger age.

They were also more likely to develop chronic diseases and show signs of advanced biological aging than those whose levels were in the average range, the NIH report said.

The study authors explain that hydration plays a role in serum sodium levels.

The normal range for serum sodium should be between 135-146 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L), according to the NIH news release.

The study authors explain that hydration plays a role in serum sodium levels.

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“Decreased body water content is the most common factor that increases serum sodium, so the results suggest that maintaining good hydration may slow the aging process and prevent or delay chronic disease,” they said.

The team collected data from 11,255 participants over a 30-year period.

Staying well hydrated is also linked to better health, fewer chronic diseases and a longer life, a new study says.

Staying well hydrated is also linked to better health, fewer chronic diseases and a longer life, a new study says.
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The NIH announcement shows that the team found that serum sodium above 142 mmol/l for those in middle age was associated with a 39% increased risk of developing chronic disease — and up to a 64% increased associated risk of developing dementia and chronic diseases such as diabetesstroke, atrial fibrillation, heart failure and peripheral artery disease.

Randomized, controlled trials are needed to determine whether optimal fluid intake can help prevent disease and promote healthy aging.

Staying well hydrated is also linked to better health, fewer chronic diseases and a longer life, the study said.

The researchers also found that participants with serum sodium levels above 144 mEq/L had a 50% increased risk of being “biologically older” than their actual age – while those around the 142 mEq/L mark had up to a 15% increased risk. compared to those who had ranges between 137 and 142 mEq/L

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Adults with levels between 144.5 and 146 mEq/L presented a 21 percent increased risk of premature death compared with those with ranges between 137-142 mEq/L, the NIH report also said.

The study authors found that adults with serum sodium levels between 138-140 mEq/L had the lowest risk of developing chronic disease.

The correlations found in the study could be useful in targeting an individual's behavioral habits and be informative for clinicians, the researchers said.

The correlations found in the study could be useful in targeting an individual’s behavioral habits and be informative for clinicians, the researchers said.
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However, the NIH release notes that the researchers’ findings do not prove cause and effect — and that randomized, controlled trials are needed to determine whether optimal fluid intake can help prevent disease and promote healthy aging.

The researchers said the correlations found in the study could be useful in targeting an individual’s behavioral habits and be informative for clinicians.

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“People whose serum sodium is 142 mEq/L or higher would benefit from [an] assessment of their fluid intake,” Dmitrieva said in the NIH release.

It is important that people discuss with a doctor how much water intake is appropriate for them and their individual situations.

People can increase their fluid intake with water, as well as with juices, vegetables and fruits with high water contentshe said in the message.

Health experts said some medical conditions can also affect fluid intake or the need to restrict fluids – so it’s important people discuss with a doctor how much water intake is right for them and their individual situations.

“The aim is to ensure that patients are getting enough fluids while assessment factors such as medicationswhich can lead to fluid loss,” said Dr. Manfred Boehm, study author and director of the Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine Laboratory, in the NIH release.

“The authors’ findings are consistent with the advice many of us received from our mothers – drink six to eight glasses of water every day,” said one doctor.
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Boehm also said in the release, “Physicians may also need to consider the patient’s current treatment plan, such as limiting fluid intake in heart failure.”

Deepak L. Bhatt, MD, MPH, is director of the Mount Sinai Heart Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Health System in New York. He was not part of the study, but told Fox News Digital that the findings were interesting and provocative.

“The authors’ findings are consistent with the advice many of us received from our mothers — drink six to eight glasses of water every day,” he said.

“Staying well hydrated is probably a good idea, but for the average healthy person, I wouldn’t say drink more water unless you’re thirsty.”

“More recently, this conventional wisdom has been challenged, with experts instead recommending drinking water only when you’re truly thirsty, not on a schedule.”

Bhatt warned: “Older people or those with some degree of dementia … can lose their sense of thirst – and in these situations, more planned water consumption can sometimes be helpful.”

Bhatt, who is also a professor of cardiovascular medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Health System, pointed out that the researchers looked at sodium levels — and it wasn’t a direct study of the amount of daily water intake.

“To prove that drinking more water actually improves health, a gold-standard randomized trial would be needed,” he said.

“Bottom line: staying well hydrated is probably a good idea, but for the average healthy person, I wouldn’t say drink more water unless you’re thirsty,” he added.

With more people working from home today, one health professional said, maybe

With more people working from home these days, one health professional said, it may be “more important to keep track of the weather and make sure you’re getting enough water to stay well hydrated.”
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“Perhaps, in this peri-pandemic period when some people may be working from home and glued to a computer, it’s more important to keep track of the time and make sure you’re getting enough water to stay well hydrated.”

Marcena Gieniusz, MD, internist and geriatrician in the Department of Medicine and Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine at Northwell Health in New Yorktold Fox News Digital, “An important takeaway from this study is that more research needs to be done to understand the dynamics between hydration and aging and how best to optimize hydration under different conditions and at the individual level to improve health and outcomes.”

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She added: “The findings from this study do not prove cause and effect – and more hydration is not synonymous with better hydration, healthier aging and better outcomes for everyone. This is important to understand.”

Dr. Gieniusz, also an assistant professor at the Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, also said, “Optimal hydration depends on the individual and the body’s needs, which are influenced by a variety of factors, including, but not limited to, activity level, medical states, time, etc.”

She noted: “When it comes to recommendations on how much water or fluids we should drink, it depends on the individual. The standard 6-8 glasses a day doesn’t apply to everyone.”

“The body is designed to self-regulate and maintain balance – although self-regulation and balance become more challenging as we age.”

Geniusz added: “The human body is very complex – and we are still learning how different systems work independently and interact with each other, including the system for using and balancing salt and fluids in the body.”

She said: “We know that the body is impressively designed to self-regulate and maintain balance – although self-regulation and balance become more challenging as we age.”

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For example, she said, “as we age, we often experience a decrease in thirst, so older people may drink [fewer] fluids, which can increase the risk of fluid depletion or dehydration – and this can sometimes lead to complications. Yet sometimes it can be a good thing.”

She added: “Some medical conditions (eg heart failure) that are more common in older people may benefit from fluid and/or salt restriction, and some patients even take medication to clear body of water to better manage their medical conditions.”

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Current National Academy of Medicine guidelines suggest that women should drink 6-9 cups (1.5-2.2 liters) daily and men should drink 8-12 cups (2-3 liters) daily, according to the release.




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